Posts Tagged ‘Zinfandel’

The 2012 ZinFest Commemorative Zinfandel is an essence of Lodi

May 4th, 2015
The 2012 ZinFest Commemorative Zinfandel is an essence of Lodi

  Each year the Lodi ZinFest produces about a 1,000 bottles of a Commemorative Lodi grown Zinfandel under a colorful Belle Époque inspired art label by our official ZinFest artist, Vince McIndoe, always featuring the same mysterious “red headed girl.” This year’s special bottling was produced by Michael McCay, whose McCay Cellars Zinfandels, in recent years, have received great critical acclaim for their pure, expressive renderings of Lodi grown fruit. In his book The New California Wine, for instance, Jon Bonné (San Francisco Chronicle’s former Wine Editor) described McCay’s Zinfandels as such: If big and brawny is Lodi’s hallmark, McCay sprinted.. VIEW MORE »

White Zinfandel is back, and better (when seriously dry) than ever!

April 6th, 2015
White Zinfandel is back, and better (when seriously dry) than ever!

  The crying of Lot 13 Don’t look now, but White Zinfandel may be back, and better than ever! That is to say, White Zinfandel vinified more like a connoisseur’s wine:  bone-dry – not a hint of residual sugar in the taste – and from intensely flavorful, ancient vine fruit. The 2014 McCay Cellars Lodi White Zinfandel ($18) may very well be the bottling that revives the category in the Lodi winegrowing region. Bottled just this past mid-March, McCay Cellars owner/winemaker Michael McCay tells us, “Right now the wine is screaming ‘pomegranate’” – in reference to the wine’s brilliant, penetrating.. VIEW MORE »

The Mokelumne River Viticultural Area (part 3) – Grapes, ungrafted vines, rags to riches

April 1st, 2015
The Mokelumne River Viticultural Area (part 3) – Grapes, ungrafted vines, rags to riches

  Continued from:  The Mokelumne River Viticultural Area (part 1 and part 2)  Transition from Table Grape to Premium Varietal Wine Production About 40% of California’s entire annual Zinfandel production is grown in the Lodi AVA; almost all of that, in the 42,000 acres of planted vines comprising the Lodi sub-region of Mokelumne River AVA. While Zinfandel is considered Mokelumne River’s heritage wine grape – cultivated in the region since the late 1850s – it is by no means the only variety of Vitis vinifera flourishing in this appellation. Black skinned varieties such as Petite Sirah, Carignan, Grenache, Barbera and.. VIEW MORE »

The Mokelumne River Viticultural Area (part 2) – winemakers talk dirty

March 28th, 2015
The Mokelumne River Viticultural Area (part 2) – winemakers talk dirty

  Continued from The Mokelumne River Viticultural Area (part 1) From sandy loams to loamy sands When Lodi winemakers extol the qualities of Mokelumne River AVA grown grapes and wines, almost universally they talk mostly about soil. It is topography and soil that distinguishes Mokelumne River from the six other sub-appellations of Lodi, and it is the variations of a single soil type – from sandy loams to loamy sands – that distinguish some parts of Mokelumne River from other parts of Mokelumne River. In the original 2005 petition submitted to the TTB for seven new American Viticultural Areas within.. VIEW MORE »

The Mokelumne River Viticultural Area (part 1)

March 26th, 2015
The Mokelumne River Viticultural Area (part 1)

Boundaries, heart and soul The Mokelumne River AVA (American Viticultural Area) is one of the seven sub-appellations located within the larger Lodi AVA established in August 2006 by the TTB (the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Tax and Trade Bureau). The AVA is named after the Mokelumne River, which drains out of the Sierra Nevada Mountains into the San Joaquin River, meandering through the northern portion of the established appellation, with connecting creeks, sloughs, a canal and aqueduct running through its interior. To qualify as an AVA, every region must demonstrate historic reasons justifying its boundaries and identity. “Mokelumne” is.. VIEW MORE »