Posts Tagged ‘Vitis vinifera’

Lodi wines compared to Texas wines, hats and cattle

December 28th, 2014
Lodi wines compared to Texas wines, hats and cattle

Jeremy Wilson – a sommelier who writes the Texas Wine Lover site and lives in the officially recognized Texas Hill Country AVA (approved in 1991), where he works for Kuhlman Cellars – recently wrote to us, telling us that he believes the Lodi AVA has a lot in common with the Texas wine industry. Not knowing a lot about Texas wines, we asked Mr. Wilson to help us catch his drift. His immediate response: “Our high quality winemaking movement is still so young that many people are totally unaware that we even have a wine industry in Texas. Our wines weren’t much.. VIEW MORE »

Lodi’s thirty-six % solution: delicious wines from less familiar grapes

June 3rd, 2014
Lodi’s thirty-six % solution:  delicious wines from less familiar grapes

One of the more interesting things to come along over the past year have been the “Seven % Solution” tastings popping up here and there.  Originally conceived by a Healdsburg wine retailer, the 7% is in reference to the idea that 93% of the wine grape acreage in California’s North Coast consists of just eight grapes, going into most of the popular varietal wines sold today:  Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Pinot Noir, Syrah, Zinfandel, Petite Sirah, Chardonnay, and Sauvignon Blanc. However, the Lodi AVA – California’s largest single winegrowing region – skews the 7% formulation somewhat.  Lodi is steady in multiple.. VIEW MORE »

The decidedly unknown (yet fantastic) Charbono grape

February 4th, 2014
The decidedly unknown (yet fantastic) Charbono grape

In a recent polemic issued on his Web site, the widely read wine critic Robert M. Parker Jr. commented on the disproportionate attention paid to “unknown” grapes by some of the new “absolutists”: “What we also have from this group of absolutists is a near-complete rejection of some of the finest grapes and the wines they produce.  Instead they espouse, with enormous gusto and noise, grapes and wines that are virtually unknown.  That’s their number one criteria – not how good it is, but how obscure it is” Ouch.  It’s been said that Mr. Parker is the single most influential.. VIEW MORE »

The mystery of Zinfandel, part 2 – the long strange trip from… somewhere

October 29th, 2013
The mystery of Zinfandel, part 2 – the long strange trip from… somewhere

Did you know that the first winery to produce a rosé, or pink colored “White Zinfandel,” from the black skinned Zinfandel grape was Lodi’s El Pinal Winery – way back in 1869?  El Pinal did not survive Prohibition, and it would not be until the late ‘60s/early ’70s that wineries like David Bruce, Ridge, Monteviña and, of course, Sutter Home would revive the idea of turning Zinfandel into something other than a red table wine. According to Charles Lewis Sullivan in his book, Zinfandel:  A History of a Grape and Its Wines, El Pinal’s technique of turning free-run Zinfandel juice into a.. VIEW MORE »

The mystery of Zinfandel, part 1: a plot as thick as the wine

October 23rd, 2013
The mystery of Zinfandel, part 1:  a plot as thick as the wine

For the longest time, Zinfandel was known as California’s “mystery grape.”  It has also been long considered an “all-American” varietal; since as far as anyone knew, Zinfandel wasn’t grown anywhere else in the world.  Make that “all-California,” because virtually all of it is grown in the state of California – and most of that, in the American Viticultural Area of Lodi. Whatever the case may be, America loves Zinfandel – whether it is made into a light, fizzy, fruity pink wine (i.e. White Zinfandel), or a moderate to humongously full, thick, lip-smacking red wines.  This black skinned grape is successfully.. VIEW MORE »