Posts Tagged ‘Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta’

The Mokelumne River Viticultural Area (part 1)

March 26th, 2015
The Mokelumne River Viticultural Area (part 1)

Boundaries, heart and soul The Mokelumne River AVA (American Viticultural Area) is one of the seven sub-appellations located within the larger Lodi AVA established in August 2006 by the TTB (the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Tax and Trade Bureau). The AVA is named after the Mokelumne River, which drains out of the Sierra Nevada Mountains into the San Joaquin River, meandering through the northern portion of the established appellation, with connecting creeks, sloughs, a canal and aqueduct running through its interior. To qualify as an AVA, every region must demonstrate historic reasons justifying its boundaries and identity. “Mokelumne” is.. VIEW MORE »

Lodi’s Mediterranean identity reflected by huge diversity of grapes

September 25th, 2013
Lodi’s Mediterranean identity reflected by huge diversity of grapes

Harvest is a great time of year for photographing wine grapes, which become the most identifiable by their colors, shapes and overall morphology during that fleeting window just before they are picked. Because Spring bud break and flowering occurred as much as two weeks ahead of normal in 2013, Lodi‘s harvest commenced during the first week of August with earlier ripening grapes like Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay, and higher acid/lower sugar Pinot Noir destined for sparkling wine production. Traditionally, harvesting of black skinned grapes for the making of fuller bodied red wines doesn’t start in earnest until mid-September, but this.. VIEW MORE »

Lodi’s alternative wine grapes, headed towards photo finish

September 5th, 2013
Lodi’s alternative wine grapes, headed towards photo finish

According to the 2012 Grape Acreage Report put out by USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, approximately 10.2% of the total acreage of fruit bearing wine grape vines in California can be classified as “other” — including many of the “alternative” style varietals more common to Lodi than in other American wine regions, such as Albariño and Aglianico, Cinsaut and Souzão, Vermentino and Verdelho, Graciano and Teroldego, Marzemino and Montepulciano, Symphony and Schönburger, Touriga and Torrontés, Pinotage and Piquepoul, and many others of, frankly, commercially obscure identity, from Albalonga to Zweigelt. The other 89.8% are among the following list of California’s 16 most widely planted varieties or.. VIEW MORE »

Pictorial guide to what makes Lodi Zinfandel so unique

July 30th, 2013
Pictorial guide to what makes Lodi Zinfandel so unique

So you think you know Lodi Zinfandel?  If you are ready to get your geek on, let’s delve into the six major reasons why Lodi grown Zinfandels are the way they are:  so compellingly lush, round, gentle, bright, and often distinctly earthy… Moderate Mediterranean climate influenced by cool coastal winds blowing through the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta Very porous yet rich, sandy loam soil (in Tokay series) on mostly lower lying, flat to gently sloped topography Choice of planting practices (most of Lodi’s older Zinfandel plantings are cultivated as head trained “goblets”) Choice of rootstocks (most of Lodi’s older Zinfandel plantings.. VIEW MORE »

Ripken’s award winning Pinot Noir, home grown in the Delta

June 19th, 2013
Ripken’s award winning Pinot Noir, home grown in the Delta

Attention, fine wine shoppers:  Lodi is now growing some first class Pinot Noir! At least, this is what a discriminating panel thought about the 2010 Ripken Vineyards Lodi Pinot Noir ($20) when they awarded it a Gold medal and “Best of Class (of Lodi)” earlier this month, during the judging process of the 2013 California State Fair Commercial Wine Competition. To attain a Gold in this particular competition, wines like the Ripken Vineyards Pinot Noir are blind-tasted right alongside Pinot Noirs from the entire state, including vaunted regions like Sonoma, Santa Barbara and Monterey.  This year 709 wineries entered 2,625 wines.. VIEW MORE »