Posts Tagged ‘Flame Tokay’

The Mokelumne River Viticultural Area (part 2) – winemakers talk dirty

March 28th, 2015
The Mokelumne River Viticultural Area (part 2) – winemakers talk dirty

  Continued from The Mokelumne River Viticultural Area (part 1) From sandy loams to loamy sands When Lodi winemakers extol the qualities of Mokelumne River AVA grown grapes and wines, almost universally they talk mostly about soil. It is topography and soil that distinguishes Mokelumne River from the six other sub-appellations of Lodi, and it is the variations of a single soil type – from sandy loams to loamy sands – that distinguish some parts of Mokelumne River from other parts of Mokelumne River. In the original 2005 petition submitted to the TTB for seven new American Viticultural Areas within.. VIEW MORE »

The Mokelumne River Viticultural Area (part 1)

March 26th, 2015
The Mokelumne River Viticultural Area (part 1)

Boundaries, heart and soul The Mokelumne River AVA (American Viticultural Area) is one of the seven sub-appellations located within the larger Lodi AVA established in August 2006 by the TTB (the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Tax and Trade Bureau). The AVA is named after the Mokelumne River, which drains out of the Sierra Nevada Mountains into the San Joaquin River, meandering through the northern portion of the established appellation, with connecting creeks, sloughs, a canal and aqueduct running through its interior. To qualify as an AVA, every region must demonstrate historic reasons justifying its boundaries and identity. “Mokelumne” is.. VIEW MORE »

A history of Lodi winegrowing, part 1

September 22nd, 2014
A history of Lodi winegrowing, part 1

Mokelumne (before Lodi was Lodi) The first settlers of European descent arrived in the area we know as Lodi in 1846; finding what Ralph A. Clark (Lodi – Images of America) described as “an abundant paradise,” perched just a few feet above sea level, sandwiched between the lower foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains to the east, and the lower elevation wetlands of the San Joaquin-Sacramento River Delta to the west. The Native American tribe occupying this plush pocket just prior to the onslaught of settlers from Europe or other states was the Plains Miwok; most of whom had already succumbed.. VIEW MORE »

Sonoma’s Morgan Twain-Peterson talks about his new Katusha Vineyard in Lodi

June 27th, 2014
Sonoma’s Morgan Twain-Peterson talks about his new Katusha Vineyard in Lodi

You see it in films, fiction, music, reality television, and even in the wine world:  everybody loves the scruffy character with the countenance of youth and artistic soul, even when it comes with forgivable hints of bravado or brashness.  Enter-stage-left, Morgan Twain-Peterson, owner/winemaker of Bedrock Wine Co. in Sonoma Valley. Over the past six, seven years Mr. Twain-Peterson has emerged as one of California’s wunderkind winemakers, with one of the most distinctive feels for terroir.  In the beginning, because of his promising bloodline, as the son of Ravenswood founder/winemaker Joel Peterson; and with that, access to many of the most.. VIEW MORE »

Lodi’s thirty-six % solution: delicious wines from less familiar grapes

June 3rd, 2014
Lodi’s thirty-six % solution:  delicious wines from less familiar grapes

One of the more interesting things to come along over the past year have been the “Seven % Solution” tastings popping up here and there.  Originally conceived by a Healdsburg wine retailer, the 7% is in reference to the idea that 93% of the wine grape acreage in California’s North Coast consists of just eight grapes, going into most of the popular varietal wines sold today:  Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Pinot Noir, Syrah, Zinfandel, Petite Sirah, Chardonnay, and Sauvignon Blanc. However, the Lodi AVA – California’s largest single winegrowing region – skews the 7% formulation somewhat.  Lodi is steady in multiple.. VIEW MORE »