Posts Tagged ‘Cinsaut’

The Mokelumne River Viticultural Area (part 3) – Grapes, ungrafted vines, rags to riches

April 1st, 2015
The Mokelumne River Viticultural Area (part 3) – Grapes, ungrafted vines, rags to riches

  Continued from:  The Mokelumne River Viticultural Area (part 1 and part 2)  Transition from Table Grape to Premium Varietal Wine Production About 40% of California’s entire annual Zinfandel production is grown in the Lodi AVA; almost all of that, in the 42,000 acres of planted vines comprising the Lodi sub-region of Mokelumne River AVA. While Zinfandel is considered Mokelumne River’s heritage wine grape – cultivated in the region since the late 1850s – it is by no means the only variety of Vitis vinifera flourishing in this appellation. Black skinned varieties such as Petite Sirah, Carignan, Grenache, Barbera and.. VIEW MORE »

Winemakers praise 2014 harvest’s brimming purple beads in this video round-up

October 14th, 2014
Winemakers praise 2014 harvest’s brimming purple beads in this video round-up

This time of year, to borrow a little from John Keats‘ phraseology, is when beaded bubbles are brimming in the bins, and winemakers are smiling with purple stained mouths.  Wine flows so much like poetry in California, you almost forget that it is still an agricultural product, and that Mother Nature always has the first, and last, word on everything. So it was with the 2014 harvest in the Lodi AVA, drawing to a close as we speak – a good two to three weeks ahead of the usual schedule.  Generally speaking, both growers and winemakers have been pleased with the.. VIEW MORE »

What makes today’s Lodi wines special?

October 1st, 2014
What makes today’s Lodi wines special?

What makes Lodi wines special? Just ten, fifteen years ago, the stock image of Lodi was as a place where Gigantic wineries, such as E. & J. Gallo and Woodbridge by Robert Mondavi, get their grapes for their bulk wines. There is a lot of Zinfandel. My, how time flies. Lodi is still known for Zinfandel, and much of the AVA‘s grapes still supply big wineries. But all of the sudden, Lodi is also becoming known for more, much more. We are counting at least seven “new” ways in which Lodi is now being defined in the minds of consumers,.. VIEW MORE »

A history of Lodi winegrowing, part 1

September 22nd, 2014
A history of Lodi winegrowing, part 1

Mokelumne (before Lodi was Lodi) The first settlers of European descent arrived in the area we know as Lodi in 1846; finding what Ralph A. Clark (Lodi – Images of America) described as “an abundant paradise,” perched just a few feet above sea level, sandwiched between the lower foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains to the east, and the lower elevation wetlands of the San Joaquin-Sacramento River Delta to the west. The Native American tribe occupying this plush pocket just prior to the onslaught of settlers from Europe or other states was the Plains Miwok; most of whom had already succumbed.. VIEW MORE »

Snapshots of Lodi’s 2014 harvest: coming in fast and furious

September 10th, 2014
Snapshots of Lodi’s 2014 harvest: coming in fast and furious

The second week of September is usually when the California grape harvest is just getting started. This year, at this same time, many growers and vintners are saying that they are more than a third of the way through. Why the accelerated time table? Three things conspired to upset 2014’s grape carts to some extent: • Spring bud break and flowering occurred two weeks (or more) ahead of normal, pushing up harvest dates accordingly. • Because grape vines respond to year-to-year variables, the larger than usual crop sizes of the two previous vintages (2012 and 2013) pre-ordained a more moderate.. VIEW MORE »