Posts Tagged ‘Acquiesce Winery’

The Mokelumne River Viticultural Area (part 2) – winemakers talk dirty

March 28th, 2015
The Mokelumne River Viticultural Area (part 2) – winemakers talk dirty

  Continued from The Mokelumne River Viticultural Area (part 1) From sandy loams to loamy sands When Lodi winemakers extol the qualities of Mokelumne River AVA grown grapes and wines, almost universally they talk mostly about soil. It is topography and soil that distinguishes Mokelumne River from the six other sub-appellations of Lodi, and it is the variations of a single soil type – from sandy loams to loamy sands – that distinguish some parts of Mokelumne River from other parts of Mokelumne River. In the original 2005 petition submitted to the TTB for seven new American Viticultural Areas within.. VIEW MORE »

Lodi’s thirty-six % solution: delicious wines from less familiar grapes

June 3rd, 2014
Lodi’s thirty-six % solution:  delicious wines from less familiar grapes

One of the more interesting things to come along over the past year have been the “Seven % Solution” tastings popping up here and there.  Originally conceived by a Healdsburg wine retailer, the 7% is in reference to the idea that 93% of the wine grape acreage in California’s North Coast consists of just eight grapes, going into most of the popular varietal wines sold today:  Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Pinot Noir, Syrah, Zinfandel, Petite Sirah, Chardonnay, and Sauvignon Blanc. However, the Lodi AVA – California’s largest single winegrowing region – skews the 7% formulation somewhat.  Lodi is steady in multiple.. VIEW MORE »

What a wine lover wants in 2014

January 9th, 2014
What a wine lover wants in 2014

What are wine lovers looking for in 2014?  Whatever it is, you can be sure that the Lodi is in the thick of it — as America’s largest American Viticultural Area, it has to be.  Let’s break it down, according to some of the buzz we are hearing in the opening days of the New Year: The “new American wine” In a recent piece in The Washington Post, longtime industry observer Dave McIntyre projects the evolution of what he calls “the new American wine,” strongly influenced by steadily growing consumer interest in wines grown and produced in states other than California.. VIEW MORE »

Lodi’s Mediterranean identity reflected by huge diversity of grapes

September 25th, 2013
Lodi’s Mediterranean identity reflected by huge diversity of grapes

Harvest is a great time of year for photographing wine grapes, which become the most identifiable by their colors, shapes and overall morphology during that fleeting window just before they are picked. Because Spring bud break and flowering occurred as much as two weeks ahead of normal in 2013, Lodi‘s harvest commenced during the first week of August with earlier ripening grapes like Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay, and higher acid/lower sugar Pinot Noir destined for sparkling wine production. Traditionally, harvesting of black skinned grapes for the making of fuller bodied red wines doesn’t start in earnest until mid-September, but this.. VIEW MORE »

Lodi’s alternative wine grapes, headed towards photo finish

September 5th, 2013
Lodi’s alternative wine grapes, headed towards photo finish

According to the 2012 Grape Acreage Report put out by USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, approximately 10.2% of the total acreage of fruit bearing wine grape vines in California can be classified as “other” — including many of the “alternative” style varietals more common to Lodi than in other American wine regions, such as Albariño and Aglianico, Cinsaut and Souzão, Vermentino and Verdelho, Graciano and Teroldego, Marzemino and Montepulciano, Symphony and Schönburger, Touriga and Torrontés, Pinotage and Piquepoul, and many others of, frankly, commercially obscure identity, from Albalonga to Zweigelt. The other 89.8% are among the following list of California’s 16 most widely planted varieties or.. VIEW MORE »